Top Ten Myths About The Glass House Mountains

Myth Number 1 - The Glass House Mountains are made of glass.


They are made of very hard rock called rhyolite and trachyte which is why they haven't eroded away yet, so sorry, No glass in the Glasshouses

The name Glasshouses came from Captain James Cook in the year 1770 as they reminded him of the chimney stacks of the glass manufacturing plants.



Myth Number 2 - There is nothing to do around the Glass House Mountains.


Well if you can't find anything to do then you either haven't got a good enough imagination or you haven't been reading my website.

Admittedly there are no big theme parks or even a good beach in the immediate area, but if you have any interest in natural and FREE activities you have plenty to choose from.

The gorgeous beaches of the Sunshine Coast are not very far away either.

If it's theme parks you are looking for I guess you had better head about two hours south to the Gold Coast. Although we do have a theme park aimed at the pre-teen market, Aussie World at the Ettamogah Pub at Palmview on the Bruce Highway. It is very popular and I can recommend it for a fuss free kids party where you have to try hard if you want to see them, and of course we have our Big Kart Track at Landsborough on Steve Irwin Way, although not a theme park it is lots of fun, especially for the "big kids".

Bush walking, rock climbing, mountain bike riding, horse riding, taking the kids to the park are all free activities we specialise in.

And some of the paid activities are : enjoying a meal at one of the local eateries, hot air ballooning, spending the day at Australia Zoo, go-carting at the Big Cart Track and going to Aussie World as discussed above as well as many more.



Myth Number 3 - People fall off the mountains "all the time"


The reality is that there are not many people who fall off the mountains, just the same as there are not many people who fall off Ayres Rock or  light planes that crash.

It is just a perception that is then reinforced by the media because it sells stories, then all the calls for banning climbing of the Glass House Mountains start.

IMHO we should be encouraging more people to walk / climb "our" mountains but we should also educate them about such things as the aboriginal history, the geology and taking care of these special places for future generations to enjoy.

And we should do whatever we can to discourage people who don't know what they are doing from climbing / walking the steepest peaks, they are dangerous places when you are not prepared or capable.




Myth Number 4 - The Glass House Mountains Aren't Worth The Drive


I feel sorry for the people who say this in various blogs and stories about our area not being worth the visit but I think I know where they are coming from.

I think they might expect a bit more in the way of developed areas in the mountains, things like tree top walks (like the Mamu Rainforest Canopy Walk In North Qld), or even a gondola ride (like Skyrail at Kuranda).

I personally wouldn't like to see the mountains damaged at all, or to see ugly development but also think it would be exciting to have a world class "eco tourism" or adventure attraction like that in this special place.

What do you think about number four of the top ten myths about the Glass House Mountains ?



Myth Number 5 - There Are No Good Restaurants At Glass House Mountains


Well we aren't a foodies paradise like Sydney or even Noosa, we have a good selection of quality eateries and award winning restaurants.

We also have good cafe's and take away places like, Subway, Eagle Boys Pizza, Domino's Pizza, Fish and Chips Takeaway (Hinterland Seafoods  at Beerwah is my pick), Chinese and Thai Restaurants and many more small specialty local eateries.

Keep watching this spot, restaurant details coming soon .....



Myth Number 6 - There is nowhere to four wheel drive at Glasshouse Mountains


Although four wheel driving is not allowed in the National Parks, if you have a registered vehicle and are a licenced driver you are welcome to drive on any formed road within the forestry.

There are hundreds of km of roads in the forestry roads that you can legally drive your four wheel drive.

Now some of the 4WD'ers get a bit of bad press and I have to admit they deserve almost all that they get when they have no regard for the environment or other people. But most are just out for a good day or weekend and admittedly they might chew up a few tracks but then again the responsible ones actually do a lot to keep the forestry tracks open for easy access for the rural fire brigade and generally forestry access.

The best areas that I am aware of is around what they call the "Glasshouse Powerline Track".

Watch this space as I will be adding some detailed 4WD info soon .....



Myth Number 7 - There's nowhere to ride my dirt bike at Glasshouse Mountains


This is a bit of a touchy subject, along with the above bit about 4WD'ing but the same applies to dirt bikes, as long as you have a registered bike and you are licenced you are welcome in any formed road in the forestry (they even have signs now that say that).

Now I know that excludes a whole heap of young folk that can't have a licence or a registered bike. I'm not sure what the answer is except to sympathise with them and agree that we need somewhere they can ride locally.

To those of you who say to them "just don't ride a dirt bike" I sort of agree but remember what it was like to be a young fella and mad keen on riding my dirt bike. Only thing is I had 800 acres of cattle property to ride on, so I was spoilt.

If anyone has a solution to this issue I would be very eager to hear from you



Myth Number 8 - Climbing The Glass House Mountains Damages Them


Firstly let me say I am not a climber, but from my understanding of climbers is that the vast majority are very environmentally aware and do their best to protect the wonders of nature that they came to explore.

Many follow a code of conduct that explains how they should treat some of the delicate and unique features of the Glass House Mountains. For example they are instructed by experienced climbers not to "bolt" the mountains (a bolt is a permanent form of protection, it is hammered into a hole drilled into the rock) a temporary fixture is preferred such as a "nut" or "cam".

So even if you are one of those people who say "ban climbing the Glass House Mountains" try to see it as a positive that these climbers choose to come to our backyard, in fact in my opinion we should encourage them the do much more "responsible" climbing but put safeguards in place to stop the so called climbers who make the news when they fall off.


Where Are The Rest Of The Top Ten Myths About The Glass House Mountains?

Yeah Yeah I know this is only 8 myths about the Glass House Mountains, but I don't know any more.

So now it is up to you, please let me know another myth or two, so I can finish this list off.

Please use to form at the bottom of this page or go to my Visitors Book if you can help


Phil

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Dreamtime 
I am sure there would be some aboriginal dreaming stories about the formation of the Glasshouse Mountains would be great if you could touch on that or …

Mordecai Not rated yet
The Glasshouse Mountains were named by Captain Cook. In fact, Captain Cook never visited Oz as he was only a Lieutenant in 1770.

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